Reading Daniel as a Text in Theological Hermeneutics by Aaron B. Hebbard

Reading Daniel as a Text in Theological Hermeneutics

Aaron B. Hebbard
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Details

  • ISBN
    9780227173640 / 0227173643
  • Title Reading Daniel as a Text in Theological Hermeneutics
  • Author Aaron B. Hebbard
  • Category Old Testaments
    Biblical Commentaries
  • Format
    Paperback
  • Year 2011
  • Pages 243
  • Publisher
    James Clarke Company
  • Language English
  • Dimensions 152mm x 18mm x 226mm

Annotation

Reading Daniel as a Text in Theological Hermeneutics sets out to read the book of Daniel as a narrative textbook in the field of theological hermeneutics. Employing such disciplines as historical criticism, literary criticism, narrative theology, and hermeneutics, this work seeks to maintain an interdisciplinary outlook on the book of Daniel.

Publisher Description

eading Daniel as a Text in Theological Hermeneutics sets out to read the book of Daniel as a narrative textbook in the field of theological hermeneutics. Employing such disciplines as historical criticism, literary criticism, narrative theology, and hermeneutics, this work seeks to maintain an interdisciplinary outlook on the book of Daniel. Two inherently linked perspectives are utilized in this reading of Daniel. First is the perception that the character of Daniel is the paradigm of the good theological hermeneut; theology and hermeneutics are inseparable and converge in the character of Daniel. Readers must recognize in Daniel certain qualities, attitudes, abilities, and convictions well worth emulating. Essentially, readers must aspire to become a Daniel. Second is the standpoint that the book of Daniel on the whole should be read as a hermeneutics textbook. Readers are led through a series of theories and exercises meant to be instilled into their theological, intellectual, and practical lives. Attention to readers is a constant endeavor throughout this thesis. The concern is fundamentally upon contemporary readers and their communities, yet with sensible consideration given to the historical readerly community with which contemporary readers find continuity. Greater concentration is placed on what the book of Daniel means for contemporary readers than on what the book of Daniel meant in its historical setting. In the end, readers are left with difficult challenges, a sobering awareness of the volatility of the business of hermeneutics, and serious implications for readers to implement both theologically and hermeneutically. (James Clarke & Co 2011)

Review
'People who have wrestled with the temporal prophecies regarding the endtimes at the conclusion of the book of Daniel will be aided by the approach of Hebbard's book ... Education as hermeneut thus expands into transformation, conversion and fulfilling vocation as we are all invited to become 'Daniels' interpreting and speaking out to others.' Patrick Madigan in Heythrop Journal Vol 53:2, March 2012. "Sometimes, one encounters a book that feels just a bit 'different'; this volume by Aaron B. Hebbard would seem to be one such example. [ - ] First, it avowedly reads the text/book of Daniel (what he terms 'Daniel') as a textbook in hermeneutics, outlining strategies for interpretation and exposing the (contemporary) reader to the challenges and issues of theological hermeneutics. Second, it avers that Daniel the character (i.e. 'Daniel') is a theological hermeneut par excellence, a skilled and trustworthy practitioner in the art of hermeneutics and interpretation, who is both mentor/teacher to other characters in the text (notably Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego) and exemplar to the contemporary reader seeking to harness their skills in such areas. [ - ] [The book's] primary interest is the contemporary reader, and thus takes seriously the narrative effect of Daniel and notably the surprising features, or oddities of the narratives; there is interesting discussion - one might say justification of Daniel's absence from Chapter 3, and it finds fruitful grounds for placing Nebuchadnezzar's doxology at the beginning of Dan 4 rather at the close of Dan 3. It is informed, without being technical (there is only one minimal reference to Hebrew/Aramaic), and would be of value to undergraduates, seminary students or theologically aware lay readers." David M. Allen: Reviews in Religion and Theology, Vol. 19 (3), 2012.

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Reading Daniel as a Text in Theological Hermeneutics