Yim Wing-chun by Lambert M. Surhone

Yim Wing-chun

Lambert M. Surhone
This product is currently unavailable.

Details

  • ISBN
    9783639945843 / 3639945840
  • Title Yim Wing-chun
  • Author Lambert M. Surhone
  • Category Language: Reference & General
  • Format
    Paperback
  • Year 2010
  • Pages 136
  • Publisher
    Vdm Verlag Dr. Muller Aktiengesellschaft & Co. Kg
  • Language English
  • Dimensions 152mm x 229mm

Annotation

High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! Yim Wing-chun is a Chinese legendary character, often cited in Wing Chun legends as the first master of the martial art bearing her name. Wing-chun, though a person's name in Chinese language, literally means “spring chant” or “forever spring,” or may be substituted with the character for “eternal springtime.” Different accounts of Yim's story exist, but the central sequence of events remains largely the same, beginning with Yim's teacher. During the Qing Dynasty, a Shaolin Buddhist nun and abbess, Ng Mui, reportedly fled the destruction of the Siu Lam Temple at the hands of the government; the temple was believed to be harbouring revolutionaries. According to one legend, Ng saw a crane and a snake fighting, and incorporated their movements into her style of Chinese boxing to form a new, unnamed martial art system.

Publisher Description

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles Yim Wing-chun is a Chinese legendary character, often cited in Wing Chun legends as the first master of the martial art bearing her name. Wing-chun, though a person's name in Chinese language, literally means “spring chant” or “forever spring,” or may be substituted with the character for “eternal springtime.” Different accounts of Yim's story exist, but the central sequence of events remains largely the same, beginning with Yim's teacher. During the Qing Dynasty, a Shaolin Buddhist nun and abbess, Ng Mui, reportedly fled the destruction of the Siu Lam Temple at the hands of the government; the temple was believed to be harbouring revolutionaries. According to one legend, Ng saw a crane and a snake fighting, and incorporated their movements into her style of Chinese boxing to form a new, unnamed martial art system.

Write a review

(never shown publicly)


Yim Wing-chun