Contact Us Need Help? Call us 1800-987-323
Explore Departments
  Free shipping Australia wide

Bringing the Internet to School: Lessons from an Urban District

  • Hardcover
"Practical, detailed advice about how to incorporate the Internet into instruction and why these new tools require new frames and supports for practice. High school educators will be especially interested to read how Internet projects can engage and empower high school students in new ways." —Milbrey W. McLaughlin, David Jacks Professor of Education and Public Policy, Stanford University "A superb book.... Required reading for those who seek to understand the social and organizational forces that shape different patterns of Internet use. This is the best book I know of to help teachers and schools make their hopes about learning from (and with) the Internet into reality." —David C. Berliner, Regents' Professor of Education, Arizona State University "Schofield and Davidson's pioneering study of how the local cultures of schooling shape the ways that teachers and students actually use Internet services in practice should be read by any educator who wants to realistically understand the opportunities and limitations of Internet use in North American schools." —Rob Kling, editor, "The Information Society," the journal of the Center for Social Informatics "The best study of computers in schools I've read.... I finished the book with a much better sense of why the Internet offers such promise-and such threat-to education as our children, parents, teachers, and technical specialists experience it today." —Sara Kiesler, professor, Human-Computer Interaction, Carnegie Mellon University "Makes a significant contribution to our understanding of the potential and challenges associated with integrating technologies into schools...illustrates the many ways in which effectivetechnology use is both facilitated and hindered by the cultural practices of schooling. This book is of great service to anyone wrestling with how to make technologies work as effective teaching and learning tools in schools." —Margaret Honey, vice president and director, Education Development Center, Center for Children and Technology
Bringing the Internet to School: Lessons from an Urban District
$42.40 + free shipping
Ships from United Kingdom
Expected delivery Dec 09 – Dec 15
Bringing the Internet to School presents the results of one of the first comprehensive studies of Internet-implementation in K-12 schools. Based on the information gleaned from this groundbreaking study, two experts in the field of high-technology and schools, Janet Ward Schofield and Ann Locke Davidson, examine the myriad issues that arise when the Internet is introduced into the classroom. This important book reveals the positive and negative consequences that Internet use has on classroom equity, academics, and social life. For example, while Internet access often changes student-teacher roles and relationships in positive ways and gives students new, exciting, and useful source for information and feedback, it also provides students with a tempting distraction from their studies and can exacerbate inequities in the classroom. Throughout the book, the authors illuminate the ways in which the existing culture and structure of schools shape Internet use, the ways students' and teachers' experiences are affected by it, and the technical and systemic challenges involved in bringing the Internet to schools.
"Practical, detailed advice about how to incorporate the Internet into instruction and why these new tools require new frames and supports for practice. High school educators will be especially interested to read how Internet projects can engage and empower high school students in new ways." —Milbrey W. McLaughlin, David Jacks Professor of Education and Public Policy, Stanford University


"A superb book.... Required reading for those who seek to understand the social and organizational forces that shape different patterns of Internet use. This is the best book I know of to help teachers and schools make their hopes about learning from (and with) the Internet into reality." —David C. Berliner, Regents' Professor of Education, Arizona State University


"Schofield and Davidson's pioneering study of how the local cultures of schooling shape the ways that teachers and students actually use Internet services in practice should be read by any educator who wants to realistically understand the opportunities and limitations of Internet use in North American schools." —Rob Kling, editor, The Information Society, the journal of the Center for Social Informatics


"The best study of computers in schools I've read.... I finished the book with a much better sense of why the Internet offers such promise-and such threat-to education as our children, parents, teachers, and technical specialists experience it today." —Sara Kiesler, professor, Human-Computer Interaction, Carnegie Mellon University


"Makes a significant contribution to our understanding of the potential and challenges associated with integrating technologies into schools...illustrates the many ways in which effective technology use is both facilitated and hindered by the cultural practices of schooling. This book is of great service to anyone wrestling with how to make technologies work as effective teaching and learning tools in schools." —Margaret Honey, vice president and director, Education Development Center, Center for Children and Technology

"Provides essential insights into the incompatibilities between the Internet and school business-as-usual and a vivid depiction of the effects-many of them unintended and unanticipated-of providing Internet access within classrooms." —Barbara Means, director, Center for Technology in Learning, SRI International

The Internet is moving into schools at an extraordinary rate, but what happens when high-technology meets the low-tech world of education? As Bringing the Internet to School shows, there is enormous variance in the way the Internet is used in educational settings and the effect it has on students, teachers, and administrators.
Bringing the Internet to School presents the results of one of the first comprehensive studies of Internet-implementation in K-12 schools. Based on the information gleaned from this groundbreaking study, two experts in the field of high-technology and schools, Janet Ward Schofield and Ann Locke Davidson, examine the myriad issues that arise when the Internet is introduced into the classroom. This important book reveals the positive and negative consequences that Internet use has on classroom equity, academics, and social life. For example, while Internet access often changes student-teacher roles and relationships in positive ways and gives students new, exciting, and useful source for information and feedback, it also provides students with a tempting distraction from their studies and can exacerbate inequities in the classroom. Throughout the book, the authors illuminate the ways in which the existing culture and structure of schools shape Internet use, the ways students' and teachers' experiences are affected by it, and the technical and systemic challenges involved in bringing the Internet to schools.
Based on research sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Spencer Foundation, the information in Bringing the Internet to School was drawn from a five-year study that includes more than three hundred interviews with teachers, students, and administrators. The book offers valuable lessons about what can be expected when districts equip their schools with the Internet and what is needed to fully realize the Internet's potential to enrich education.

Janet Ward Schofield is professor of psychology and senior scientist at the Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh. She is author of Computers and Classroom Culture and Black and White in School. Ann Locke Davidson operates Educational Connections, an educational consulting firm in Portland, Oregon. She is author of several books including Making and Molding Identity in Schools and Adolescents' World.
Preface. The Authors. 1. Introduction. 2. Building Demand and Support for Internet Use Among Educators. 3. School Versus Internet Culture: Implications for Communication with the Outside World. 4. How School Culture and Structure Shape Internet Use. 5. Achieving Internet Use: Lessons from NET Schools. 6. Classroom Change Accompanying Internet Use. 7. Teacher and Student Outcomes Related to Internet Use. 8. Achieving Institutionalization. 9. Conclusion. Appendix. References. Name Index. Subject Index.
provoking, thoroughly researched and clearly written report...this guide provides...much food for thought." (Publishers Weekly, February 4, 2002) "[t]his is a fascinating and timely analysis of the Networking for Education Testbed". (Library Journal, March 15, 2002)
For the last decade, school reform has become almost synonymous with initiatives to provide schools with computers and access to the World Wide Web. If students and teachers could just get hooked up to all that electronic information, the argument goes, schools would be radically transformed, student achievement would soar and educational inequities would disappear. Not quite, say Schofield and Davidson, authors of this provoking, thoroughly researched and clearly written report. After a five-year study into the implementation of computer technology in one school district, the authors argue that the extravagant claims of Internet-for-education proponents must be tempered by an actual understanding of how school cultures both shape-and are shaped by-technological innovation. Not surprisingly, the positive and negative consequences of Internet use in schools practically mirror each other. While the Internet supports virtually unlimited exploration, this can distract students and take them "off-task." It can expose students to a variety of viewpoints, but many of these are highly controversial or lack credibility. The use of computers can support increased students' autonomy regarding their learning, but teachers may feel that they are losing control of the curriculum. Other barriers, such as lack of time for teachers to prepare lessons and inadequately functioning machines are perhaps more easily addressed, given sufficient resources. For educators, administrators and policy makers who want to make the most of the Internet, this guide provides meager practical solutions but much food for thought. (Mar.) (Publishers Weekly, February 4, 2002)

This is a fascinating and timely analysis of the Networking for Education Testbed (NET), a five-year National Science Foundation program designed to foster the use of the Internet in schools. Schofield (psychology, Univ. of Pittsburgh; Computers and Classroom Culture) and Davidson (Making and Molding Identity in Schools) touch on issues related to educational leadership (e.g., how to foster the adoption of new technologies and new approaches to pedagogy), educational reform (e.g., changes at the district, building, and classroom level), and the sociology of the teaching profession. Their study offers concrete examples of both the benefits and the challenges associated with using the Internet in the classroom and demonstrates a number of ways in which the roles of teachers and students can be affected by the adoption of the new technology. As more and more schools implement technology and make use of the wide variety of information resources available over the Internet, the lessons learned by these "earIy adopters" remain invaluable. Recommended for academic, professional education, and technology collections. --Scott Waltelr, Washington State Univ., Pullman (Library Journal, March 15, 2002)

"Practical, detailed advice about how to incorporate the Internet into instruction and why these new tools require new frames and supports for practice. High school educators will be especially interested to read how Internet projects can engage and empower high school students in new ways." —Milbrey W. McLaughlin, David Jacks Professor of Education and Public Policy, Stanford University

"A superb book.... Required reading for those who seek to understand the social and organizational forces that shape different patterns of Internet use. This is the best book I know of to help teachers and schools make their hopes about learning from (and with) the Internet into reality." —David C. Berliner, Regents' Professor of Education, Arizona State University

"Schofield and Davidson's pioneering study of how the local cultures of schooling shape the ways that teachers and students actually use Internet services in practice should be read by any educator who wants to realistically understand the opportunities and limitations of Internet use in North American schools." —Rob Kling, editor, The Information Society, the journal of the Center for Social Informatics

"The best study of computers in schools I've read.... I finished the book with a much better sense of why the Internet offers such promise-and such threat-to education as our children, parents, teachers, and technical specialists experience it today." —Sara Kiesler, professor, Human-Computer Interaction, Carnegie Mellon University

"Makes a significant contribution to our understanding of the potential and challenges associated with integrating technologies into schools...illustrates the many ways in which effective technology use is both facilitated and hindered by the cultural practices of schooling. This book is of great service to anyone wrestling with how to make technologies work as effective teaching and learning tools in schools." —Margaret Honey, vice president and director, Education Development Center, Center for Children and Technology

Shows how school life changes--for better and worse--when the Internet is introduced and offers a.
  • Credible, yet hopeful illustration of the challenges in large-scale technology integration.
  • Examines a wide range of schools serving a wide range of students--from poor to affluent, elementary to high school.
  • Assesses the underlying cultural issues that affect the speed and success of technology integration.
Author
Janet Ward Schofield
Pages
393
Publisher
Jossey-Bass
Language
English
ISBN-10
0787956864
ISBN-13
9780787956868
Media
Book
Format
Hardcover
DEWEY
371.334
Year
2002
Publication Date
2002-02-28
Imprint
Jossey-Bass Inc.,U.S.
Subtitle
Lessons from an Urban District
Country of Publication
United States
Illustrations
references, indexes
Edition
1st
Place of Publication
New York
Residence
Pittsburgh, PA, US
Audience
General/Trade
Short Title
BRINGING THE INTERNET TO SCHOO
Series
Jossey-Bass Education (Hardcover)
FREE DELIVERY

Delivery is free to any Australian address. No matter where your item is going.

SECURE PAYMENT

We use 100% PCI DSS compliant payment services. That means your payment information is always protected, and never gets seen by anyone.

30 DAY RETURN POLICY

Return any item within 30 days of delivery. It doesn’t matter why you want to return your item, you can free of charge!