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Black Gun, Silver Star: The Life and Legend of Frontier Marshal Bass Reeves

Arthur T. Burton


  • Paperback
    $53.81
PUBLISHED: 30th April 2008
ISBN: 9780803217478
ANNOTATION:
Deputy U.S. Marshal Bass Reeves appears as one of "eight notable Oklahomans," the "most feared U.S. marshal in the Indian country." That Reeves was also an African American who had spent his early life as a slave in Arkansas and Texas makes his accomplishments all the more remarkable. Bucking the odds ("I'm sorry, we didn't keep black people's history," a clerk at one of Oklahoma's local historical societies answered a query), Art T. Burton sifts through fact and legend to discover the truth about one of the most outstanding peace officers in late nineteenth-century America—and perhaps the greatest lawman of the Wild West era. Fluent in Creek and other southern Native languages, physically powerful, skilled with firearms, and a master of disguise, Reeves was exceptionally adept at apprehending fugitives and outlaws, and his exploits were legendary in Oklahoma and Arkansas. A finalist for the 2007 Spur Award, sponsored by the Western Writers of America, "Black Gun, Silver Star" tells Bass Reeves's story for the first time and restores this remarkable figure to his rightful place in the history of the American West.
Black Gun, Silver Star: The Life and Legend of Frontier Marshal Bass Reeves
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  • Paperback
    $53.81
PUBLISHED: 30th April 2008
ISBN: 9780803217478
ANNOTATION:
Deputy U.S. Marshal Bass Reeves appears as one of "eight notable Oklahomans," the "most feared U.S. marshal in the Indian country." That Reeves was also an African American who had spent his early life as a slave in Arkansas and Texas makes his accomplishments all the more remarkable. Bucking the odds ("I'm sorry, we didn't keep black people's history," a clerk at one of Oklahoma's local historical societies answered a query), Art T. Burton sifts through fact and legend to discover the truth about one of the most outstanding peace officers in late nineteenth-century America—and perhaps the greatest lawman of the Wild West era. Fluent in Creek and other southern Native languages, physically powerful, skilled with firearms, and a master of disguise, Reeves was exceptionally adept at apprehending fugitives and outlaws, and his exploits were legendary in Oklahoma and Arkansas. A finalist for the 2007 Spur Award, sponsored by the Western Writers of America, "Black Gun, Silver Star" tells Bass Reeves's story for the first time and restores this remarkable figure to his rightful place in the history of the American West.

Annotation

Deputy U.S. Marshal Bass Reeves appears as one of "eight notable Oklahomans," the "most feared U.S. marshal in the Indian country." That Reeves was also an African American who had spent his early life as a slave in Arkansas and Texas makes his accomplishments all the more remarkable. Bucking the odds ("I'm sorry, we didn't keep black people's history," a clerk at one of Oklahoma's local historical societies answered a query), Art T. Burton sifts through fact and legend to discover the truth about one of the most outstanding peace officers in late nineteenth-century America—and perhaps the greatest lawman of the Wild West era. Fluent in Creek and other southern Native languages, physically powerful, skilled with firearms, and a master of disguise, Reeves was exceptionally adept at apprehending fugitives and outlaws, and his exploits were legendary in Oklahoma and Arkansas. A finalist for the 2007 Spur Award, sponsored by the Western Writers of America, "Black Gun, Silver Star" tells Bass Reeves's story for the first time and restores this remarkable figure to his rightful place in the history of the American West.

Publisher Description

In The Story of Oklahoma, Deputy U.S. Marshal Bass Reeves appears as one of "eight notable Oklahomans," the "most feared U.S. marshal in the Indian country." That Reeves was also an African American who had spent his early life as a slave in Arkansas and Texas made his accomplishments all the more remarkable. Black Gun, Silver Star tells Bass Reeves's story for the first time, sifting through fact and legend to discover the truth about one of the most outstanding peace officers in late-nineteenth-century America--and perhaps the greatest lawman of the Wild West era. Bucking the odds ("I'm sorry, we didn't keep black people's history," a clerk at one of Oklahoma's local historical societies answered to a query), Art T. Burton traces Reeves from his days of slavery to his soldiering in the Civil War battles of the Trans-Mississippi Theater to his career as a deputy U.S. marshal out of Fort Smith, Arkansas, beginning in 1875 when he worked under "Hanging Judge" Isaac C. Parker.Fluent in Creek and other southern Native languages, physically powerful, skilled with firearms, and a master of disguise, Reeves was exceptionally adept at apprehending fugitives and outlaws and his exploits were legendary in Oklahoma and Arkansas. Black Gun, Silver Star restores this remarkable figure to his rightful place in the history of the American West. Art T. Burton is a professor of history at South Suburban College in South Holland, Illinois. He is the author of Black, Buckskin, and Blue: African American Scouts and Soldiers on the Western Frontier and Black, Red, and Deadly: Black and Indian Gunfighters of the Indian Territory, 1870-1907.

Author Biography

Art T. Burton is a professor of history at South Suburban College in South Holland, Illinois. He is the author of "Black, Buckskin, and Blue: African American Scouts and Soldiers on the Western Frontier" and "Black, Red, and Deadly: Black and Indian Gunfighters of the Indian Territory, 1870-1907."

Table of Contents

List of IllustrationsForewordAcknowledgmentsIntroduction: Uncovering the History of Black Deputy U.S. Marshals1. The Lone Ranger and Other Stories2. Arkansas Son3. Van Buren and Fort Smith4. On the Trail5. "No Sunday West of St. Louis, No God West of Fort Smith"6. Gunman's Territory7. Hell on the Border8. Trial of the Century9. Back on the Trail10. The Winds of Change11. Land of the Six-Shooter12. Paris, Texas13. Northern District, Indian Territory14. Muskogee Marshal15. A New Century16. Devotion to Duty17. The Invincible Marshal18. A Lawman to the EndEpilogueAppendixNotesBibliographyIndex

Review

"The book is a good addition to the history of law enforcement in the Twin Territories. Students of this area will certainly want to add the book to their library."-Western Outlaw-Lawman History Association Journal Western Outlaw-Lawman History Association Journal "As Burton traces Reeves' exploits through oral accounts, records of court proceedings and scraps of correspondence, his fascination with the subject helps to maintain a vigorous pace and ultimately makes Black Gun, Silver Star an eye-opening study of justice and race in the Old West."-Nick Smith, The Post and Courier (Charleston, SC) -- Nick Smith Post and Courier "[Burton's] years of research resulted in a remarkable story of an Old West giant, one who arguably was the best in his business."-True West True West "Aside from a few fluff films (like Mel Brooks's Blazing Saddles) and a smattering of lesser-known scholarship, the African-American presence in Wild West history has been severely underrepresented. . . . Against this backdrop rises Burton's painstaking account of U.S. Deputy Marshal Bass Reeves. . . . Rigorous and impartial, Burton is less concerned with entertainment than faithful research-no small task given the Old West's diverse and troubled racial climate, in which black accomplishment often went overlooked. But dedicated readers will become acquainted with a brave, resourceful lawman and the patchwork of homesteaders, murderers, horse thieves and bootleggers he governed." -Publishers Weekly. Publishers Weekly "[This] biography is more statement of fact than tribute to Reeves and no punches are pulled. Bass had an exceptionally long tenure as a Deputy U. S. Marshal and made a few mistakes along the way. These are covered. But, so too, are the remarkable feats he accomplished. . . . No critic, then or now has been able to show that Bass did not do good and bring law and order to the frontier. Art's rendering takes on all comers and their questions. The book is a heck of a good read and not the least bit painful."-Mike Tower, Oklahombres.org -- Mike Tower Oklahombres.org

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Biography of legendary black lawman Bass Reeves in the Indian Territory

Product Details

Author
Arthur T. Burton
Short Title
BLACK GUN SILVER STAR
Pages
346
Publisher
University of Nebraska Press
Series
Race and Ethnicity in the American West
Language
English
ISBN-10
0803217471
ISBN-13
9780803217478
Media
Book
Format
Paperback
Illustrations
Yes
Year
2008
Publication Date
2008-04-30
Subtitle
The Life and Legend of Frontier Marshal Bass Reeves
Country of Publication
United States