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A Pattern Language: Towns, Buildings, Construction

Christopher Alexander and Sara Ishikawa


  • Hardcover
    $96.24
PUBLISHED: 31st August 1977
ISBN: 9780195019193
ANNOTATION:
You can use this book to design a house for yourself with your family; you can use it to work with your neighbors to improve your town and neighborhood; you can use it to design an office, or a workshop, or a public building. And you can use it to guide you in the actual process of construction.
$96.24
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OTHER FORMATS:
  • Hardcover
    $96.24
PUBLISHED: 31st August 1977
ISBN: 9780195019193
ANNOTATION:
You can use this book to design a house for yourself with your family; you can use it to work with your neighbors to improve your town and neighborhood; you can use it to design an office, or a workshop, or a public building. And you can use it to guide you in the actual process of construction.

Annotation

You can use this book to design a house for yourself with your family; you can use it to work with your neighbors to improve your town and neighborhood; you can use it to design an office, or a workshop, or a public building. And you can use it to guide you in the actual process of construction.

Publisher Description

"Brilliant....Here's how to design or redesign any space you're living or working in—from metropolis to room. Consider what you want to happen in the space, and then page through this book. Its radically conservative observations will spark, enhance, organize your best ideas, and a wondrous home, workplace, town will result"—San Francisco Chronicle. This classic handbook presents a language which ordinary people can use to express themselves in their own communities or homes, and to better communicate with each other.

Author Biography

Christopher Alexander, winner of the first medal for research ever awarded by the American Institute of Architects, is a practicing architect and contractor, Professor of Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley, and Director of the Center for Environmental Structure.

Table of Contents

USING THIS BOOK A pattern language Summary of the language Choosing a language for your project The poetry of the language TOWNS Using the language Patterns BUILDINGS Using the language Patterns CONSTRUCTION Using the language Patterns ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Review

"A wise old owl of a book, one to curl up with in an inglenook on a rainy day.... Alexander may be the closest thing home design has to a Zen master."--The New York Times "A classic. A must read!"--T. Colbert, University of Houston "The design student's bible for relativistic environmental design."--Melinda La Garce, Southern Illinois University "Brilliant....Here's how to design or redesign any space you're living or working in--from metropolis to room. Consider what you want to happen in the space, and then page through this book. Its radically conservative observations will spark, enhance, organize your best ideas, and a wondrous home, workplace, town will result."--San Francisco Chronicle "The most important book in architecture and planning for many decades, a landmark whose clarity and humanity give hope that our private and public spaces can yet be made gracefully habitable."--The Next Whole Earth Catalog

Long Description

You can use this book to design a house for yourself with your family; you can use it to work with your neighbors to improve your town and neighborhood; you can use it to design an office, or a workshop, or a public building. And you can use it to guide you in the actual process of construction. After a ten-year silence, Christopher Alexander and his colleagues at the Center for Environmental Structure are now publishing a major statement in the form of three books which will, in their words, "lay the basis for an entirely new approach to architecture, building and planning, which will we hope replace existing ideas and practices entirely." The three books are The Timeless Way of Building, The Oregon Experiment, and this book, A Pattern Language. At the core of these books is the idea that people should design for themselves their own houses, streets, and communities. This idea may be radical (it implies a radical transformation of the architectural profession) but it comes simply from the observation that most of the wonderful places of the world were not made by architects but by the people. At the core of the books, too, is the point that in designing their environments people always rely on certain "languages," which, like the languages we speak, allow them to articulate and communicate an infinite variety of designs within a forma system which gives them coherence. This book provides a language of this kind. It will enable a person to make a design for almost any kind of building, or any part of the built environment. "Patterns," the units of this language, are answers to design problems (How high should a window sill be? How many stories should a building have? How much space in a neighborhood should be devoted to grass and trees?). More than 250 of the patterns in this pattern language are given: each consists of a problem statement, a discussion of the problem with an illustration, and a solution. As the authors say in their introduction, many of the patterns are archetypal, so deeply rooted in the nature of things that it seemly likely that they will be a part of human nature, and human action, as much in five hundred years as they are today.

Review Text

"A wise old owl of a book, one to curl up with in an inglenook on a rainy day.... Alexander may be the closest thing home design has to a Zen master."--The New York Times "A classic. A must read!"--T. Colbert, University of Houston "The design student's bible for relativistic environmental design."--Melinda La Garce, Southern Illinois University "Brilliant....Here's how to design or redesign any space you're living or working in--from metropolis to room. Consider what you want to happen in the space, and then page through this book. Its radically conservative observations will spark, enhance, organize your best ideas, and a wondrous home, workplace, town will result."--San Francisco Chronicle "The most important book in architecture and planning for many decades, a landmark whose clarity and humanity give hope that our private and public spaces can yet be made gracefully habitable."--The Next Whole Earth Catalog

Feature

Selling point: Will enable a person to make a design for almost any kind of building, or any part of the built environment Selling point: More than 250 patterns are provided for design problems: each consists of a problem statement, a discussion of the problem with an illustration, and a solution. Selling point: The final title in a series of three books by Christopher Alexander that lays the basis for an entirely new approach to architecture

Product Details

Author
Christopher Alexander, Sara Ishikawa
Short Title
PATTERN LANGUAGE
Pages
1216
Publisher
Oxford University Press, USA
Language
English
ISBN-10
0195019199
ISBN-13
9780195019193
Media
Book
Format
Hardcover
Illustrations
Yes
Year
1977
Publication Date
1977-08-31
Series
Center for Environmental Structure Series
Subtitle
Towns, Buildings, Construction
Residence
US
Audience
General/Trade
Country of Publication
United States

Product Reviews

02 Jul, 2018
Very informative. An interesting philosophy about the way we live and could live within buildings and communities.
By Denise
14 May, 2018
By Paul
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