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Madame Bovary

by Gustave Flaubert

ANNOTATION:
"This translation first published ... 2010"--T.p. verso.
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ISBN: 9780143123804
ANNOTATION:
"This translation first published ... 2010"--T.p. verso.

Annotation

"This translation first published ... 2010"--T.p. verso.

Publisher Description

Emma Bovary is an avid reader of sentimental novels; brought up on a Normandy farm and convent-educated, she longs for the passion of romance. At first, Emma pins her hopes on marriage, but life with her well-meaning husband in the provinces leaves her bored and dissatisfied. She seeks escape through extravagant spending sprees and, eventually, adultery. As Emma pursues her impossible reverie she seals her own ruin and despair. Exquisite, moving, at times ferociously satirical and always psychologically acute, "Madame Bovary" remains one of the greatest, most beguiling novels ever written. This stunning new translation, by the celebrated novelist Adam Thorpe, delicately and meticulously transposes the rhythms, tone and poetry of Madame Bovary and brings us closer to its shifting depths. It is destined to become the definitive English translation of our time.

Author Biography

The Modern Library has played a significant role in American cultural life for the better part of a century. The series was founded in 1917 by the publishers Boni and Liveright and eight years later acquired by Bennett Cerf and Donald Klopfer. It provided the foundation for their next publishing venture, Random House. The Modern Library has been a staple of the American book trade, providing readers with affordable hardbound editions of important works of literature and thought. For the Modern Library's seventy-fifth anniversary, Random House redesigned the series, restoring as its emblem the

Review

Winner of the 2012 Fifty Books/Fifty Covers show, organized by Design Observer in association with AIGA and Designers & Books Winner of the 2014 Type Directors Club Communication Design Award

Praise for Lydia Davis's translation of Madame Bovary "[Flaubert's] masterwork has been given the English translation it deserves." --Kathryn Harrison, The New York Times Book Review

"Dazzling . . . translated to perfect pitch . . . [Davis has] left us the richer with this translation. . . . I'd certainly say it is necessary to have hers." --Jacki Lyden, NPR.org, Favorite Books of the Year

"One of the most important books of the year . . . Flaubert's strict, elegant, rhythmic sentences come alive in Davis's English." --James Wood, The New Yorker's Book Bench Praise for Penguin Drop Caps:

"[Penguin Drop Caps] convey a sense of nostalgia for the tactility and aesthetic power of a physical book and for a centuries-old tradition of beautiful lettering." --Fast Company

"Vibrant, minimalist new typographic covers.... Bonus points for the heartening gender balance of the initial selections." --Maria Popova, Brain Pickings

"The Penguin Drop Caps series is a great example of the power of design. Why buy these particular classics when there are less expensive, even free editions of Great Expectations? Because they're beautiful objects. Paul Buckley and Jessica Hische's fresh approach to the literary classics reduces the design down to typography and color. Each cover is foil-stamped with a cleverly illustrated letterform that reveals an element of the story. Jane Austen's A (Pride and Prejudice) is formed by opulent peacock feathers and Charlotte Bronte's B (Jane Eyre) is surrounded by flames. The complete set forms a rainbow spectrum prettier than anything else on your bookshelf." --Rex Bonomelli, The New York Times

"Drool-inducing." --Flavorwire

"Classic reads in stunning covers--your book club will be dying." --Redbook

Review Quote

Winner of the 2012 Fifty Books/Fifty Covers show, organized by Design Observer in association with AIGA and Designers & Books Winner of the 2014 Type Directors Club Communication Design Award Praise for Lydia Davis' translation of Madame Bovary : "[Flaubert's] masterwork has been given the English translation it deserves." -Kathryn Harrison, The New York Times Book Review "Dazzling . . . translated to perfect pitch . . . [Davis has] left us the richer with this translation. . . . I'd certainly say it is necessary to have hers." -Jacki Lyden, NPR.org, Favorite Books of the Year "One of the most important books of the year . . . Flaubert's strict, elegant, rhythmic sentences come alive in Davis's English." -James Wood, The New Yorker 's Book Bench Praise for Penguin Drop Caps: "Vibrant, minimalist new typographic covers…. Bonus points for the heartening gender balance of the initial selections." -Maria Popova, Brain Pickings "The Penguin Drop Caps series is a great example of the power of design. Why buy these particular classics when there are less expensive, even free editions of Great Expectations ? Because they're beautiful objects. Paul Buckley and Jessica Hische's fresh approach to the literary classics reduces the design down to typography and color. Each cover is foil-stamped with a cleverly illustrated letterform that reveals an element of the story. Jane Austen's A ( Pride and Prejudice ) is formed by opulent peacock feathers and Charlotte Bronte's B ( Jane Eyre ) is surrounded by flames. The complete set forms a rainbow spectrum prettier than anything else on your bookshelf." -Rex Bonomelli, The New York Times "Drool-inducing." - Flavorwire "Classic reads in stunning covers-your book club will be dying." - Redbook

Excerpt from Book

Chapter One The uncouth schoolboy; The Bovary household; A mother''s ambitions; Studies with the cure; Training for medici≠ Student life in Rouen; Failure and success; A practice in Normandy; The bailiff''s widow; The first Madame Bovary. We were in the prep-room when the Head came in, followed by a new boy in mufti and a beadle carrying a big desk. The sleepers aroused themselves, and we all stood up, putting on a startled look, as if we had been buried in our work. The Head motioned to us to sit down. ''Monsieur Roger,'' said he in a quiet tone to the prep master, I''ve brought you a new boy. He''s going into the second. If his conduct and progress are satisfactory, he will be put up with the boys of his own age. '' The new boy had kept in the background, in the corner behind the door, almost out of sight. He was a country lad of about fifteen, and taller than any of us. His hair was clipped straight across the forehead, like a village choirboy''s. He seemed a decent enough fellow, but horribly nervous. Although he was not broad across the shoulders, his green cloth jacket, with its black buttons, looked as if it pinched him under the arms and revealed, protruding well beyond the cuffs, a pair of raw, bony wrists, obviously not unaccustomed to exposure. His legs, encased in blue stockings, issued from a pair of drab-coloured breeches, very tightly braced. He had on a pair of thick, clumsy shoes, not particularly well cleaned and plentifully fortified with nails. The master began to hear the boys at their work. The newcomer listened with all his ears, drinking it in as attentively as if he had been in church, not daring to cross his legs or to lean his elbows on the desk, and when two o''clock came and the bell rang for dismissal, the master had to call him back to earth and tell him to line up with the rest of us. It was our custom, when we came in to class, to throw our caps on the floor, in order to have our hands free. As soon as ever we got inside the door, we ''buzzed'' them under the form, against the wall, so as to kick up plenty of dust. That was supposed to be ''the thing.'' Whether he failed to notice this manoeuvre or whether he was too shy to join in it, it is impossible to say, but when prayers were over he was still nursing his cap. That cap belonged to the composite order of headgear, and in it the heterogeneous characteristics of the busby, the Polish shapska, the bowler, the otterskin toque and the cotton nightcap were simultaneously represented. It was, in short, one of those pathetic objects whose mute unloveliness conveys the infinitely wistful expression we may sometimes note on the face of an idiot. Ovoid in form and stiffened with whalebone, it began with a sort of triple line of sausage-shaped rolls running all round its circumference; next, separated by a red band, came alternate patches of velvet and rabbit-skin; then a kind of bag or sack which culminated in a stiffened polygon elaborately embroidered, whence, at the end of a long, thin cord, hung a ball made out of gold wire, by way of a tassel. The cap was brand-new, and the peak of it all shiny. ''Stand up,'' said the master. He stood up, and down went his cap. The whole class began to laugh. He bent down to recover it. One of the boys next to him jogged him with his elbow and knocked it down again. Again he stooped to pick it up. ''You may discard your helmet,'' said the master, who had a pretty wit. A shout of laughter from the rest of the class quite put the poor fellow out of countenance, and so flustered was he that he didn''t know whether to keep it in his hand, put it on the floor or stick it on his head. He sat down and deposited it on his knees. ''Stand up,'' said the master again, ''and tell me your name.'' In mumbling tones the new boy stammered out something quite unintelligible. ''Again!'' Again came the inarticulate mumble, drowned by the shouts of the class. ''Louder!'' rapped out the master sharply. ''Speak up!'' Whereupon the boy, in desperation, opened his jaws as wide as they would go and, with the full force of his lungs, as though he were hailing somebody at a distance, fired off the word ''Charbovari.'' In an instant the class was in an uproar. The din grew louder and louder, a ceaseless crescendo crested with piercing yells--they shrieked, they howled, they stamped their feet, bellowing at the top of their voices: ''Charbovari! Charbovari!'' Then, after a while, the storm began to subside. There would be sporadic outbreaks from time to time, smothered by a terrific effort, or perhaps a titter would fizz along a whole row, or a stifled explosion sputter out here and there, like a half-extinguished fuse. However, beneath a hail of ''impositions,'' order was gradually restored. The master--who had had it dictated, spelled out and read over to him--had at length succeeded in getting hold of the name of Charles Bovary, and forthwith he ordered the hapless wretch to go and sit on the dunce''s stool, immediately below the seat of authority. He started to obey, stopped short and stood hesitating. ''What are you looking for?'' said the master. ''My ca--'' began the new boy timidly, casting an anxious glance around him. An angry shout of ''Five hundred lines for the whole class'' checked, like the Quos ego, a fresh outburst. ''Stop your noise, then, will you?'' continued the master indignantly, mopping his brow with a handkerchief which he had produced from the interior of his cap.

Description for Sales People

A new gift series of classic literature with beautifully designed, foil stamped covers. Jessica Hische's blog dailydropcap.com has over 50,000 unique visitors a month with over 60,000 twitter followers. The complete unabridged text of Flaubert's most famous novel. Perfect for elegant gifts. Other letters in the series are available from Turnaround.

Product Details

Author
Gustave Flaubert
Short Title
MADAME BOVARY
Publisher
Penguin Books
Language
English
Illustrator
Jessica Hische
ISBN-10
0143123807
ISBN-13
9780143123804
Media
Book
Format
Hardcover
Residence
Rouen, FR
Year
2012
Translator
Lydia Davis
Publication Date
2012-11-28
Country of Publication
United States
Pages
432
Series
Penguin Drop Caps
Audience
General/Trade
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